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LAW: USING THE WEB FOR RESEARCH

Search Google Scholar

Google Scholar Search

For more details on how to search Google Scholar see Link to Google Scholar Search Tips

You can set Google Scholar to Findit@Brightonwhen you are off campus.

Select Scholar Settings. Under Library links type in 'University of Brighton', check box in results and click Save,

Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature. From one place, you can search across many disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites.

The short video introduces you to Google Scholar. For more guidance on how to search using Google Scholar visit the LinkedIn Learning tutorial:  https://www.linkedin.com/learning/google-apps-for-students

Key Websites

Legal Abbreviations

Law reports and law periodicals are cited by an abbreviated version of their full title. Each series has an official abbreviation. You can check the meaning of an abbreviation online using the Cardiff Index to legal abbreviations.

For example:

Warren v Random House Group Ltd

[2009] 2 W.L.R. 314

In this example, the abbreviation W.L.R stands for Weekly Law Reports.

This is an example of a traditional citation and refers to a case that was reported on in 2009. The law report relating to this case can be found in the 2nd volume of the 2009 Weekly Law Reports, on page 314.

You will also come across neutral citations. Neutral citations have been in use since 2001. High Court and Court of Appeal cases are cited using this form of citation, which denotes the year the case was heard, the court that issued the judgement and the case number.

For example:

Warren v Random House Group Ltd

[2008] EWCA Civ 834         

2008 is the year the case was heard, EWCA Civ (Court of Appeal Civil Division) is the court that issued the judgement (use the Cardiff Index to legal abbreviations to decipher the abbreviation) and 834 is the judgement number.

Use Westlaw and Lexis to search for these reports. You should also use these legal databases to find journal articles.

OneSearch does not search Westlaw and Lexis. You need to search these databases directly.